MLK Day

I am sorry that I did not write about the importance of Martin Luther King Day. I sat down with every intention to, in fact, I wrote the title of this article Sunday. I wanted the post to be up early, a rare thing for this blog. However, once the title was written, I stared at the blinking line atop the blank page, and found myself unable to write. Words escaped me. A state that is most unusual to me.
I could have written something simple “Today we remember the legacy of a great man”, or something thought provoking “Today we stop to remember, remember the enduring legacy of a common man who achieved extraordinary things. A man born of humble origins, who guided by a dream, did what no one thought possible. A man whose undying vision for our world still shines today.” But none of these seemed right. For some reason I was unable to put pen to paper and publish these posts.
I now know why I was unable to bring myself to publish these words. I was, and remain, ashamed. I look at the man whom we were meant to honor, and could not bring myself to a part of the lie any longer. I am ashamed of what has happened to the legacy of Dr. King. What has become of his memory. The truth of the man has become muddied by the greed of man, and his memory has become a wrath summoned to bring down hatred and division across the nation.
With the events of the past year I cannot bring myself to claim that the legacy of Dr. King lives on. The events in Ferguson, where facts were forsaken for hatred, and peace cast aside for violence. A city burned, and the vultures swarmed. Men who once stood beside Dr. King incited bitter hatred in the hearts of thousands. How anyone can look at what happened in Ferguson and think that Dr. King’s memory is alive, is beyond me.
Corrupt men have bastardized his memory, stolen his image, to suit their own twisted political agendas. They make claims on his character, and cast out anyone who dares question them. His own niece was not allowed to speak at the anniversary event of his “I have a Dream” speech. His own blood turned away. The reason given, his own niece did not really know the man. The truth, she spoke out against the lies put out tainting the character and memory of her uncle.
Dr. King left us a great legacy, one that should continue to inspire us, and guide us into the future. He gave to us a vision for the future. A world united, where men were to be judge by the content of their character, not the color of his skin. A world where one’s deeds would define oneself, not their ethnicity, religion, or creed. He showed us, that great change does not have to come at the barrel of a gun, or the tip of a spear. Common people refusing to lower themselves to the level of barbarians, can send a powerful message. Tell me how the divisive rhetoric of men like Al Sharpton honors this memory, this legacy, this vision?
I hear the chanting in the streets, “black lives matter”, and I cannot help but weep. How is it possible that our nation could have fallen so far? How have the lessons of Dr. King been forgotten so quickly? To honor Dr. King, one has to forget this notion of “social justice”, and return for what Dr. King fought for, Equal Justice. Equal protection before the eyes of the law. Yes Black lives matter, so do Hispanic, Asian, American Indians, and White. A nation so divided by racial lines, cannot begin to honor the memory of Dr. King.
Ferguson does not disqualify us from honoring Dr. King. It is not the disease, but rather a symptom. The violence that rocked that city was not created in a vacuum. What disqualifies us from Honoring Dr. King are these opportunistic spineless, power hungry thugs who seek to exploit racial tensions. These once decent men who have been consumed by the lust for power, who have become dependent upon racial fears for their vary survival. If we had been building on the legacy of Dr. King, not corrupting it, Ferguson would not have happened. If we had not allowed multiculturalists to divide our nation, and prevent the formation of a unified culture, Ferguson would not have happened.
Dr. King dreamt of a world where we could all live together, in peace. We would not care what color your skin was, what your religion was, or were you came from. We would coexists in this world, living together as brothers. A common culture, that united the peoples of this nation. If we had built upon that, Ferguson could not have happened. We would have had our mutual culture to fall back on. A culture of equality, and justice, level heads would have prevailed. Until we stop allowing the United States to be defined as “whites, blacks, others”, I just do not believe we have the moral authority to celebrate the legacy of such a great man.
Dr. King was a great man, who showed to us the possibility of a truly United nation. He showed the world that men born of humble origins, through strength of conviction, dedication to a cause, and a belief in justice and equality could change the world. No one is born a victim; no one must accept their station in life. Anyone can achieve greatness. He proved that the color of your skin did not determine your place in this world. He showed to us that it was the content of your heart that defined who you could become. A message that I think everyone best start remembering.

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